What to Look For in a Potential Cat Boarding Facility

While cats are very independent creatures, and are typically fine if left alone for several hours throughout the day, you may want to have your cat boarded, or cared for in a type of facility, if you'll be away for any extended period of time. This is especially important if your cat is very energetic and loves to run around the house, as this might increase its chances of breaking something or of getting injured. Note a few features to look for and questions to ask when choosing a potential cat boarding facility, so you know your beloved pet will be in good hands.

Ventilation

Because cats in a boarding facility will usually use indoor litter boxes rather than relieving themselves outside, ventilation is very important for such facilities. However, you'll want to do more note any bad odours in the facility, as you may visit right after litter boxes have been cleaned, or those odours may be masked by air fresheners and other such products. Instead, check on the number of actual windows or ventilation fans, and other such means of venting bad air, dust from litter boxes, dander, and the like, in a facility.

Noise

Cats are very sensitive to loud noises, and may become easily startled and upset by a noisy environment. Note if the facility you're considering for your cat seems overly noisy; is it near a construction site or school, or a busy roadway where horns and other traffic sounds might be bothersome? Does the staff play a television or radio that might also be very noisy for the cat? If the facility houses other animals, consider how far away dogs are kept, as their barking can also be upsetting to cats, even if the dogs are physically separated from the cats in the building.

Space

Cats are not necessarily social creatures, so they may not want to share their space with other cats, and may actually want some room away from other animals. Note the overall space of a facility, especially as compared to how many animals they board every day; you can even ask how many cats they take in during one day, and note if there would be sufficient space for all of them to roam freely, and away from each other. Consider, too, if there is adequate lounging space with comfortable pillows or carpeted areas for all the cats to relax and nap, as you don't want your pet to be left on a cold linoleum floor when it's time to sleep.


Share